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Artemisinin combination therapy mass drug administration in a setting of low malaria endemicity: programmatic coverage and adherence during an observational study in Zanzibar

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Artemisinin combination therapy mass drug administration in a setting of low malaria endemicity: programmatic coverage and adherence during an observational study in Zanzibar
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1982-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdullah S. Ali, Narjis G. Thawer, Bakar Khatib, Haji H. Amier, Joseph Shija, Mwinyi Msellem, Abdul-wahid Al-mafazy, Issa A. Garimo, Humphrey Mkali, Mahdi M. Ramsan, Jessica M. Kafuko, Lynn A. Paxton, Richard Reithinger, Jeremiah M. Ngondi

Abstract

Mass drug administration (MDA) appears to be effective in reducing the risk of malaria parasitaemia. This study reports on programmatic coverage and compliance of MDA using artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in four shehias (smallest administration unit) that had been identified as hotspots through Zanzibar's malaria case notification surveillance system. Mass drug administration was done in four shehias selected on the basis of: being an established malaria hot spot; having had mass screening and treatment (MSaT) 2-6 weeks previously; and exceeding the epidemic alert threshold of 5 cases within a week even after MSaT. Communities were sensitized and MDA was conducted using a house-to-house approach. All household members, except pregnant women and children aged less than 2 months, were provided with ACT medicine. Two weeks after the MDA campaign, a survey was undertaken to investigate completion of ACT doses. A total of 8816 [97.1% of eligible; 95% confidence interval (CI) 96.8-97.5] people received ACT. During post MDA surveys, 2009 people were interviewed: 90.2% reported having completed MDA doses; 1.9% started treatment but did not complete dosage; 4.7% did not take treatment; 2.0% were absent during MDA and 1.2% were ineligible (i.e. infants <2 months and pregnant women). Main reasons for failure to complete treatment were experience of side-effects and forgetting to take subsequent doses. Failure to take treatment was mainly due to fear of side-effects, reluctance due to lack of malaria symptoms and caregivers forgetting to give medication to children. Mass drug administration for malaria was well accepted by communities at high risk of malaria in Zanzibar, with high participation and completion rates. Further work to investigate the potential of MDA in accelerating Zanzibar's efforts towards malaria elimination should be pursued.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 19 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 10%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 23 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#4,079,401
of 16,077,324 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,147
of 4,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,983
of 273,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,077,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,531 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them