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Tuberculosis in alpaca (Lama pacos) on a farm in Ireland. 2. Results of an epidemiological investigation

Overview of attention for article published in Irish Veterinary Journal, August 2008
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  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 218)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Tuberculosis in alpaca (Lama pacos) on a farm in Ireland. 2. Results of an epidemiological investigation
Published in
Irish Veterinary Journal, August 2008
DOI 10.1186/2046-0481-61-8-533
Pubmed ID
Authors

DJ Connolly, PJ Dwyer, J Fagan, M Hayes, EG Ryan, E Costello, A Kilroy, SJ More

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB), due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis was diagnosed in a flock of alpaca in Ireland in 2004. An epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the risk of TB for farmed alpaca where TB is endemic, the origin of the infection, the potential for alpaca-to-alpaca transmission and appropriate control measures. The investigation focused on the alpaca flock (including the farm, animal movements and breeding, feeding and flock health practice), the disease episode (including animal disease events and subsequent control measures) and TB infection risk in the locality. The TB risk to alpaca is high in areas where infection is endemic in cattle and badgers and where biosecurity is inadequate. It is most likely that the source of infection for the alpaca was a local strain of M. bovis, present in cattle in this area since at least 2001. Genotyping of isolates identified a single variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) profile in both cattle and alpaca in this region. Although a tuberculous badger was also removed from the vicinity, bacterial isolation was not attempted. On this farm, infection in alpaca was probably derived from a common source. Alpaca-to-alpaca transmission seems unlikely. Two broad control strategies were implemented, aimed at the rapid removal of infected (and potentially infectious) animals and the implementation of measures to limit transmission. Tests that proved useful in detecting potentially-infected animals included measurement of the albumin-to-globulin ratio and regular body condition scoring. Skin testing was time consuming and unproductive, and early detection of infected animals remains a challenge. The flock was managed as a series of separate groupings, based on perceived infection risk. No further TB cases have been detected.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Other 2 12%
Professor 2 12%
Other 4 24%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 47%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2021.
All research outputs
#5,678,126
of 21,774,582 outputs
Outputs from Irish Veterinary Journal
#40
of 218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,677
of 205,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Irish Veterinary Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,774,582 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 218 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,395 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them