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Mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, January 2017
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2 tweeters

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20 Dimensions

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12974-016-0770-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien, Seron, Mercedes Valls, Ferwerda, Bart, Tanck, Michael W., Zwinderman, Aeilko H., Baas, Frank, van der Ende, Arie, Schwaeble, William J., Brouwer, Matthijs C., van de Beek, Diederik, E. Soemirien Kasanmoentalib, Mercedes Valls Seron, Bart Ferwerda, Michael W. Tanck, Aeilko H. Zwinderman, Frank Baas, Arie van der Ende, Matthijs C. Brouwer, Diederik van de Beek

Abstract

Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the pro-inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. We investigated mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease (MASP-2) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from the diagnostic lumbar puncture, which was available for 307 of 792 pneumococcal meningitis episodes included in our prospective nationwide cohort study (39%), and the association between these levels and clinical outcome. Subsequently, we studied the role of MASP-2 in our experimental pneumococcal meningitis mouse model using Masp2 (-/-) mice and evaluated the potential of adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies in wild-type (WT) mice. MASP-2 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis were correlated with poor functional outcome. Consistent with these human data, Masp2-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower cytokine levels and increased survival compared to WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies led to reduced complement activation and decreased disease severity. MASP-2 contributes to poor disease outcome in human and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies can be used to attenuate the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 35%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Professor 1 4%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2017.
All research outputs
#15,425,062
of 22,997,544 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1,760
of 2,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#256,221
of 421,721 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#22
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,997,544 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 421,721 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.