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The development of an ivermectin-based attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) to target Anopheles arabiensis

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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114 Mendeley
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Title
The development of an ivermectin-based attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) to target Anopheles arabiensis
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1994-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frank Chelestino Tenywa, Athumani Kambagha, Adam Saddler, Marta Ferreira Maia

Abstract

An increasing number of countries in sub-Saharan Africa are moving towards malaria-elimination, mostly thanks to successful vector control campaigns. However, elimination has proven challenging, resulting in the persistence of malaria transmission. It is now accepted that in order to eliminate malaria, new complementary vector control approaches must be developed. This study describes the development of a sugar-baited resting place containing a toxic dose of ivermectin for the control of Anopheles arabiensis. Dose response experiments were performed in insectary conditions to determine the LD90 of ivermectin against An. arabiensis. Over 95% of An. arabiensis were knocked down 48 h post-sugar feeding on 10% sucrose solutions containing 0.01% ivermectin. When investigating different juices as attractants, it was observed that An. arabiensis preferred orange, watermelon and commercial guava juice over pawpaw, tomato, mango or banana, but were most likely to feed on simple 10% sugar solution. Using recycled materials, different bait prototypes were tested to determine the best design to maximize sugar feeding. Baits that offered a resting place for the mosquito rather than just a surface to sugar feed were more likely to attract An. arabiensis to sugar feed. The optimized prototype was then placed in different locations within a screen-house, colour-coded with different food dyes, containing competing vegetation (Ricinus communis) and experimental huts where humans slept under bed nets. Around half of all the released An. arabiensis sugar fed on the sugar baits, and approximately 50% of all sugar fed mosquitoes chose the baits close to outdoor vegetation before entering the huts. Ivermectin is an effective insecticide for use in sugar baits. The design of the sugar bait can influence feeding rates and, therefore, efficacy. Sugar baits that offer a resting surface are more efficient and sugar feeding on the baits is maximized when these are placed close to peri-domestic vegetation. Attractive toxic sugar baited resting places may provide an additional vector control method to complement with existing strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 114 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 21%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 30 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Environmental Science 6 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 37 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2022.
All research outputs
#2,398,945
of 22,888,307 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#532
of 5,579 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,925
of 316,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#20
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,888,307 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,579 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,043 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.