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Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: a systematic review of reviews

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2009
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Title
Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: a systematic review of reviews
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2009
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-9-182
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louk WH Peters, Gerjo Kok, Geert TM Ten Dam, Goof J Buijs, Theo GWM Paulussen

Abstract

Most school health education programs focus on a single behavioral domain. Integrative programs that address multiple behaviors may be more efficient, but only if the elements of change are similar for these behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine which effective elements of school health education are similar across three particular behavioral domains. A systematic review of reviews of the effectiveness of school-based health promotion programs was conducted for the domains of substance abuse, sexual behavior, and nutrition. The literature search spanned the time period between 1995 and October 2006 and included three databases, websites of review centers and backward search. Fifty-five reviews and meta-analyses met predetermined relevance and publication criteria and were included. Data was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. A standardized data extraction form was used, with detailed attention to effective elements pertaining to program goals, development, content, methods, facilitator, components and intensity. Two assessors rated the quality of reviews as strong, moderate or weak. We included only strong and moderate reviews in two types of analysis: one based on interpretation of conflicting results, the other on a specific vote-counting rule. Thirty six reviews were rated strong, 6 moderate, and 13 weak. A multitude of effective elements was identified in the included reviews and many elements were similar for two or more domains. In both types of analysis, five elements with evidence from strong reviews were found to be similar for all three domains: use of theory; addressing social influences, especially social norms; addressing cognitive-behavioral skills; training of facilitators; and multiple components. Two additional elements had positive results in all domains with the rule-based method of analysis, but had inconclusive results in at least one domain with the interpretation-based method of analysis: parent involvement and a larger number of sessions. Five effective elements of school health promotion were found to be similar across the three behavioral domains examined (substance abuse, sexual behavior, nutrition). An integrative program that addresses the three domains seems feasible. The five elements are primary candidates to include in programs targeting these behaviors.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 237 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 223 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 17%
Student > Master 41 17%
Researcher 38 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 7%
Lecturer 15 6%
Other 53 22%
Unknown 32 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 23%
Social Sciences 46 19%
Psychology 34 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 3%
Other 27 11%
Unknown 42 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#9,295,781
of 11,623,235 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,858
of 7,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,131
of 264,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#112
of 137 outputs
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