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Subacute left ventricle free wall rupture after acute myocardial infarction: awareness of the clinical signs and early use of echocardiography may be life-saving

Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Ultrasound, November 2006
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Title
Subacute left ventricle free wall rupture after acute myocardial infarction: awareness of the clinical signs and early use of echocardiography may be life-saving
Published in
Cardiovascular Ultrasound, November 2006
DOI 10.1186/1476-7120-4-46
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luís Raposo, Maria João Andrade, Jorge Ferreira, Carlos Aguiar, Rute Couto, Miguel Abecasis, Manuel Canada, Nuno Jalles-Tavares, José Aniceto da Silva

Abstract

Left ventricular free wall rupture (LVFWR) is a fearful complication of acute myocardial infarction in which a swift diagnosis and emergency surgery can be crucial for successful treatment. Because a significant number of cases occur subacutely, clinicians should be aware of the risk factors, clinical features and diagnostic criteria of this complication. We report the case of a 69 year-old man in whom a subacute left ventricular free wall rupture (LVFWR) was diagnosed 7 days after an inferior myocardial infarction with late reperfusion therapy. An asymptomatic 3 to 5 mm saddle-shaped ST-segment elevation in anterior and lateral leads, detected on a routine ECG, led to an urgent bedside echocardiogram which showed basal inferior-wall akinesis, a small echodense pericardial effusion and a canalicular tract from endo to pericardium, along the interface between the necrotic and normal contracting myocardium, trough which power-Doppler examination suggested blood crossing the myocardial wall. A cardiac MRI further reinforced the possibility of contained LVFWR and a surgical procedure was undertaken, confirming the diagnosis and allowing the successful repair of the myocardial tear. This case illustrates that subacute LVFWR provides an opportunity for intervention. Recognition of the diversity of presentation and prompt use of echocardiography may be life-saving.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 27%
Other 4 18%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 68%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,535,373
of 13,225,882 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Ultrasound
#203
of 246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,796
of 268,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Ultrasound
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,225,882 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 246 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.