↓ Skip to main content

Origin and diversification of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes in plants

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Origin and diversification of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes in plants
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0891-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ping-Li Liu, Liang Du, Yuan Huang, Shu-Min Gao, Meng Yu

Abstract

Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs) are the largest group of receptor-like kinases in plants and play crucial roles in development and stress responses. The evolutionary relationships among LRR-RLK genes have been investigated in flowering plants; however, no comprehensive studies have been performed for these genes in more ancestral groups. The subfamily classification of LRR-RLK genes in plants, the evolutionary history and driving force for the evolution of each LRR-RLK subfamily remain to be understood. We identified 119 LRR-RLK genes in the Physcomitrella patens moss genome, 67 LRR-RLK genes in the Selaginella moellendorffii lycophyte genome, and no LRR-RLK genes in five green algae genomes. Furthermore, these LRR-RLK sequences, along with previously reported LRR-RLK sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, were subjected to evolutionary analyses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant LRR-RLKs belong to 19 subfamilies, eighteen of which were established in early land plants, and one of which evolved in flowering plants. More importantly, we found that the basic structures of LRR-RLK genes for most subfamilies are established in early land plants and conserved within subfamilies and across different plant lineages, but divergent among subfamilies. In addition, most members of the same subfamily had common protein motif compositions, whereas members of different subfamilies showed variations in protein motif compositions. The unique gene structure and protein motif compositions of each subfamily differentiate the subfamily classifications and, more importantly, provide evidence for functional divergence among LRR-RLK subfamilies. Maximum likelihood analyses showed that some sites within four subfamilies were under positive selection. Much of the diversity of plant LRR-RLK genes was established in early land plants. Positive selection contributed to the evolution of a few LRR-RLK subfamilies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 141 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 23%
Researcher 23 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Student > Master 17 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 12%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 22 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 27%
Environmental Science 3 2%
Chemistry 3 2%
Computer Science 3 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 28 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2017.
All research outputs
#9,297,606
of 11,626,228 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,957
of 2,230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,566
of 264,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#37
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,626,228 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,230 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.