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Topographical aspects in the dynamics of sleep homeostasis in young men: individual patterns

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, August 2011
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Title
Topographical aspects in the dynamics of sleep homeostasis in young men: individual patterns
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, August 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-12-84
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Rusterholz, Peter Achermann

Abstract

Sleep homeostasis refers to the increase of sleep pressure during waking and the decrease of sleep intensity during sleep. Electroencephalography (EEG) slow-wave activity (SWA; EEG power in the 0.75-4.5 Hz range) is a marker of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep intensity and can be used to model sleep homeostasis (Process S). SWA shows a frontal predominance, and its increase after sleep deprivation is most pronounced in frontal areas. The question arises whether the dynamics of the homeostatic Process S also show regional specificity. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of SWA is characteristic for an individual and may reflect traits of functional anatomy. The aim of the current study was to quantify inter-individual variation in the parameters of Process S and investigate their spatial distribution. Polysomnographic recordings obtained with 27 EEG derivations of a baseline night of sleep and a recovery night of sleep after 40 h of sustained wakefulness were analyzed. Eight healthy young subjects participated in this study. Process S was modeled by a saturating exponential function during wakefulness and an exponential decline during sleep. Empirical mean SWA per NREM sleep episode at episode midpoint served for parameter estimation at each derivation. Time constants were restricted to a physiologically meaningful range.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 42 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Master 3 7%
Professor 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Psychology 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2011.
All research outputs
#9,905,488
of 12,372,276 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#693
of 993 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,261
of 90,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#4
of 7 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 993 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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