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Main lesions in the central nervous system of dogs due to Leishmania infantum infection

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, August 2017
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Main lesions in the central nervous system of dogs due to Leishmania infantum infection
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-1174-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weline Lopes Macau, Joicy Cortez de Sá, Ana Patrícia de Carvalho da Silva, Alessandra Lima Rocha, Renata Mondêgo-Oliveira, Fábio Henrique Evangelista de Andrade, Caroline Magalhães Cunha, Kátia da Silva Calabrese, Ana Lucia Abreu-Silva

Abstract

Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is endemic in São Luís Maranhão/Brazil and it leads a varied clinical picture, including neurological signs. Histopathological evaluation showed that 14 dogs exhibited pathological alterations in at least one of the analyzed areas. Of these, mononuclear inflammatory reaction was the most frequent, although other lesions, such as hemorrhage, chromatolysis and gliosis were also observed. The presence of L. infantum amastigotes was confirmed in eight dogs, identified in four regions: telencephalon, hippocampus, thalamus and caudal colliculus, but only one presented neurological signs. Polymerase chain reaction results detected the DNA of the parasite in 11 samples from seven dogs. The positive areas were the telencephalon, thalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, caudal and rostral colliculus. These results reveal that during canine visceral leishmaniasis, the central nervous system may display some alterations, without necessarily exhibiting clinical neurological manifestations. In addition, the L. infantum parasite has the ability to cross the blood brain barrier and penetrate the central nervous system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 11 21%
Unknown 15 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 18 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,264,719
of 11,667,520 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#752
of 1,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,110
of 264,301 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#27
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,667,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,593 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,301 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.