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Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, August 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report
Published in
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13019-017-0629-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tetsuro Uchida, Azumi Hamasaki, Eiichi Ohba, Atsushi Yamashita, Jun Hayashi, Mitsuaki Sadahiro

Abstract

Heyde syndrome is known as a triad of calcific aortic stenosis, anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, and acquired type 2A von Willebrand disease. This acquired hemorrhagic disorder is characterized by the loss of the large von Willebrand factor multimers due to the shear stress across the diseased aortic valve. The most frequently observed type of bleeding in these patients is mucosal or skin bleeding, such as epistaxis, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding. On the other hand, intracranial hemorrhage complicating Heyde syndrome is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman presented to our hospital with severe aortic stenosis and severe anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with Heyde syndrome. Although aortic valve replacement was performed without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, postoperative life-threatening acute subdural hematoma occurred with a marked midline shift. Despite prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, she did not recover consciousness and she died 1 month after the operation. Postoperative subdural hematoma is rare, but it should be kept in mind as a devastating hemorrhagic complication, especially in patients with Heyde syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 22%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 7 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Unknown 9 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2017.
All research outputs
#9,302,162
of 11,632,136 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
#205
of 369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,387
of 263,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,632,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 369 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.