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Microbial regulation of microRNA expression in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 1,292)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
31 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
131 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages
googleplus
170 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
262 Mendeley
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Title
Microbial regulation of microRNA expression in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex
Published in
Microbiome, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40168-017-0321-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alan E. Hoban, Roman M. Stilling, Gerard M. Moloney, Rachel D. Moloney, Fergus Shanahan, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan, Gerard Clarke

Abstract

There is growing evidence for a role of the gut microbiome in shaping behaviour relevant to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. Preclinical studies using germ-free (GF) animals have been essential in contributing to our current understanding of the potential importance of the host microbiome for neurodevelopment and behaviour. In particular, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that manipulation of the gut microbiome modulates anxiety-like behaviours. The neural circuits that underlie anxiety- and fear-related behaviours are complex and heavily depend on functional communication between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Previously, we have shown that the transcriptional networks within the amygdala and PFC of GF mice are altered. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act through translational repression to control gene translation and have also been implicated in anxiety-like behaviours. However, it is unknown whether these features of host post-transcriptional machinery are also recruited by the gut microbiome to exert control over CNS transcriptional networks. We conducted Illumina® next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the amygdala and PFC of conventional, GF and germ-free colonized mice (exGF). We found a large proportion of miRNAs to be dysregulated in GF animals in both brain regions (103 in the amygdala and 31 in the PFC). Additionally, colonization of GF mice normalized some of the noted alterations. Next, we used a complementary approach to GF by manipulating the adult rat microbiome with an antibiotic cocktail to deplete the gut microbiota and found that this strategy also impacted the expression of relevant miRNAs. These results suggest that the microbiome is necessary for appropriate regulation of miRNA expression in brain regions implicated in anxiety-like behaviours.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 131 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 262 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 262 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 16%
Researcher 42 16%
Student > Bachelor 37 14%
Student > Master 32 12%
Other 16 6%
Other 49 19%
Unknown 44 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 44 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 33 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 11%
Psychology 17 6%
Other 46 18%
Unknown 50 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 522. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2021.
All research outputs
#34,470
of 21,427,634 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#12
of 1,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#904
of 290,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,427,634 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,536 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them