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Study protocol subacromial impingement syndrome: the identification of pathophysiologic mechanisms (SISTIM)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2011
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Title
Study protocol subacromial impingement syndrome: the identification of pathophysiologic mechanisms (SISTIM)
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-12-282
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pieter Bas de Witte, Jochem Nagels, Ewoud RA van Arkel, Cornelis PJ Visser, Rob GHH Nelissen, Jurriaan H de Groot

Abstract

The subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common diagnosed disorder of the shoulder in primary health care, but its aetiology is unclear. Conservative treatment regimes focus at reduction of subacromial inflammatory reactions or pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns (intrinsic aetiology). Long-lasting symptoms are often treated with surgery, which is focused at enlarging the subacromial space by resection of the anterior part of the acromion (based on extrinsic aetiology). Despite that acromionplasty is in the top-10 of orthopaedic surgical procedures, there is no consensus on its indications and reported results are variable (successful in 48-90%). We hypothesize that the aetiology of SIS, i.e. an increase in subacromial pressure or decrease of subacromial space, is multi-factorial. SIS can be the consequence of pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns leading to humerus cranialisation, anatomical variations of the scapula and the humerus (e.g. hooked acromion), a subacromial inflammatory reaction (e.g. due to overuse or micro-trauma), or adjoining pathology (e.g. osteoarthritis in the acromion-clavicular-joint with subacromial osteophytes).We believe patients should be treated according to their predominant etiological mechanism(s). Therefore, the objective of our study is to identify and discriminate etiological mechanisms occurring in SIS patients, in order to develop tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 224 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 221 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 49 22%
Student > Master 48 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 10%
Student > Postgraduate 18 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 5%
Other 34 15%
Unknown 41 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 97 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 15%
Sports and Recreations 15 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 4%
Engineering 8 4%
Other 16 7%
Unknown 46 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2014.
All research outputs
#3,078,704
of 4,507,211 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,164
of 1,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,964
of 107,839 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#84
of 113 outputs
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