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The skin microbiome: impact of modern environments on skin ecology, barrier integrity, and systemic immune programming

Overview of attention for article published in World Allergy Organization Journal, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 692)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
104 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
459 Mendeley
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Title
The skin microbiome: impact of modern environments on skin ecology, barrier integrity, and systemic immune programming
Published in
World Allergy Organization Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40413-017-0160-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan L. Prescott, Danica-Lea Larcombe, Alan C. Logan, Christina West, Wesley Burks, Luis Caraballo, Michael Levin, Eddie Van Etten, Pierre Horwitz, Anita Kozyrskyj, Dianne E Campbell

Abstract

Skin barrier structure and function is essential to human health. Hitherto unrecognized functions of epidermal keratinocytes show that the skin plays an important role in adapting whole-body physiology to changing environments, including the capacity to produce a wide variety of hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokine that can potentially influence whole-body states, and quite possibly, even emotions. Skin microbiota play an integral role in the maturation and homeostatic regulation of keratinocytes and host immune networks with systemic implications. As our primary interface with the external environment, the biodiversity of skin habitats is heavily influenced by the biodiversity of the ecosystems in which we reside. Thus, factors which alter the establishment and health of the skin microbiome have the potential to predispose to not only cutaneous disease, but also other inflammatory non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Indeed, disturbances of the stratum corneum have been noted in allergic diseases (eczema and food allergy), psoriasis, rosacea, acne vulgaris and with the skin aging process. The built environment, global biodiversity losses and declining nature relatedness are contributing to erosion of diversity at a micro-ecological level, including our own microbial habitats. This emphasises the importance of ecological perspectives in overcoming the factors that drive dysbiosis and the risk of inflammatory diseases across the life course.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 459 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 459 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 72 16%
Student > Bachelor 69 15%
Student > Master 63 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 12%
Other 31 7%
Other 73 16%
Unknown 95 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 70 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 66 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 43 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 17 4%
Other 88 19%
Unknown 111 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 306. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2021.
All research outputs
#67,153
of 19,033,718 outputs
Outputs from World Allergy Organization Journal
#4
of 692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,162
of 283,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Allergy Organization Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,033,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 692 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them