↓ Skip to main content

Branched-chain amino acids and muscle protein synthesis in humans: myth or reality?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, August 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 844)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
745 tweeters
facebook
99 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
video
58 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
669 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Branched-chain amino acids and muscle protein synthesis in humans: myth or reality?
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12970-017-0184-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert R. Wolfe

Abstract

The branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are leucine, valine and isoleucine. A multi-million dollar industry of nutritional supplements has grown around the concept that dietary supplements of BCAAs alone produce an anabolic response in humans driven by a stimulation of muscle protein synthesis. In this brief review the theoretical and empirical bases for that claim are discussed. Theoretically, the maximal stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in the post-absorptive state in response to BCAAs alone is the difference between muscle protein breakdown and muscle protein synthesis (about 30% greater than synthesis), because the other EAAs required for synthesis of new protein can only be derived from muscle protein breakdown. Realistically, a maximal increase in muscle protein synthesis of 30% is an over-estimate because the obligatory oxidation of EAAs can never be completely suppressed. An extensive search of the literature has revealed no studies in human subjects in which the response of muscle protein synthesis to orally-ingested BCAAs alone was quantified, and only two studies in which the effect of intravenously infused BCAAs alone was assessed. Both of these intravenous infusion studies found that BCAAs decreased muscle protein synthesis as well as protein breakdown, meaning a decrease in muscle protein turnover. The catabolic state in which the rate of muscle protein breakdown exceeded the rate of muscle protein synthesis persisted during BCAA infusion. We conclude that the claim that consumption of dietary BCAAs stimulates muscle protein synthesis or produces an anabolic response in human subjects is unwarranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 745 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 669 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 669 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 150 22%
Student > Master 103 15%
Other 61 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 55 8%
Researcher 47 7%
Other 98 15%
Unknown 155 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 134 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 101 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 71 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 66 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 62 9%
Other 54 8%
Unknown 181 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 690. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2021.
All research outputs
#19,565
of 20,126,709 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#8
of 844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#495
of 287,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,126,709 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,209 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them