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Hypoxic exosomes facilitate bladder tumor growth and development through transferring long non-coding RNA-UCA1

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cancer, August 2017
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Title
Hypoxic exosomes facilitate bladder tumor growth and development through transferring long non-coding RNA-UCA1
Published in
Molecular Cancer, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12943-017-0714-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mei Xue, Wei Chen, An Xiang, Ruiqi Wang, He Chen, Jingjing Pan, Huan Pang, Hongli An, Xiang Wang, Huilian Hou, Xu Li

Abstract

To overcome the hostile hypoxic microenvironment of solid tumors, tumor cells secrete a large number of non-coding RNA-containing exosomes that facilitate tumor development and metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms of tumor cell-derived exosomes during hypoxia are unknown. Here, we aim to clarify whether hypoxia affects tumor growth and progression by transferring long non-coding RNA-urothelial cancer-associated 1 (lncRNA-UCA1) enriched exosomes secreted from bladder cancer cells. We used bladder cancer 5637 cells with high expression of lncRNA-UCA1 as exosome-generating cells and bladder cancer UMUC2 cells with low expression of lncRNA-UCA1 as recipient cells. Exosomes derived from 5637 cells cultured under normoxic or hypoxic conditions were isolated and identified by transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis and western blotting analysis. These exosomes were co-cultured with UMUC2 cells to evaluate cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We further investigated the roles of exosomal lncRNA-UCA1 derived from hypoxic 5637 cells by xenograft models. The availability of lncRNA-UCA1 in serum-derived exosomes as a biomarker for bladder cancer was also assessed. We found that hypoxic exosomes derived from 5637 cells promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and hypoxic exosomal RNAs could be internalized by three bladder cancer cell lines. Importantly, lncRNA-UCA1 was secreted in hypoxic 5637 cell-derived exosomes. Compared with normoxic exosomes, hypoxic exosomes derived from 5637 cells showed the higher expression levels of lncRNA-UCA1. Moreover, Hypoxic exosomal lncRNA-UCA1 could promote tumor growth and progression though epithelial-mesenchymal transition, in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the expression levels of lncRNA-UCA1 in the human serum-derived exosomes of bladder cancer patients were higher than that in the healthy controls. Together, our results demonstrate that hypoxic bladder cancer cells remodel tumor microenvironment to facilitate tumor growth and development though secreting the oncogenic lncRNA-UCA1-enriched exosomes and exosomal lncRNA-UCA1 in human serum has the possibility as a diagnostic biomarker for bladder cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 24%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Researcher 5 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 28 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Engineering 3 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 38 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,014,645
of 11,729,435 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cancer
#484
of 995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,083
of 263,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cancer
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,729,435 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 995 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,823 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.