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Environmental versatility promotes modularity in genome-scale metabolic networks

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Systems Biology, August 2011
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Environmental versatility promotes modularity in genome-scale metabolic networks
Published in
BMC Systems Biology, August 2011
DOI 10.1186/1752-0509-5-135
Pubmed ID
Authors

Areejit Samal, Areejit Samal, Andreas Wagner, Olivier C Martin

Abstract

The ubiquity of modules in biological networks may result from an evolutionary benefit of a modular organization. For instance, modularity may increase the rate of adaptive evolution, because modules can be easily combined into new arrangements that may benefit their carrier. Conversely, modularity may emerge as a by-product of some trait. We here ask whether this last scenario may play a role in genome-scale metabolic networks that need to sustain life in one or more chemical environments. For such networks, we define a network module as a maximal set of reactions that are fully coupled, i.e., whose fluxes can only vary in fixed proportions. This definition overcomes limitations of purely graph based analyses of metabolism by exploiting the functional links between reactions. We call a metabolic network viable in a given chemical environment if it can synthesize all of an organism's biomass compounds from nutrients in this environment. An organism's metabolism is highly versatile if it can sustain life in many different chemical environments. We here ask whether versatility affects the modularity of metabolic networks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 5%
Germany 2 2%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 2 2%
Norway 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Unknown 81 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 27%
Student > Master 9 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 11%
Computer Science 8 9%
Engineering 5 5%
Physics and Astronomy 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2011.
All research outputs
#2,672,563
of 5,039,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Systems Biology
#393
of 731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,802
of 63,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Systems Biology
#17
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,039,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 731 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 63,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.