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Multi-locus phylogeny of lethal amanitas: Implications for species diversity and historical biogeography

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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68 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Multi-locus phylogeny of lethal amanitas: Implications for species diversity and historical biogeography
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-14-143
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qing Cai, Rodham E Tulloss, Li P Tang, Bau Tolgor, Ping Zhang, Zuo H Chen, Zhu L Yang

Abstract

Lethal amanitas (Amanita section Phalloideae) are a group of wild, fatal mushrooms causing many poisoning cases worldwide. However, the diversity and evolutionary history of these lethal mushrooms remain poorly known due to the limited sampling and insufficient gene fragments employed for phylogenetic analyses. In this study, five gene loci (nrLSU, ITS, rpb2, ef1-alpha and beta-tubulin) with a widely geographic sampling from East and South Asia, Europe, North and Central America, South Africa and Australia were analysed with maximum-likelihood, maximum-parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Biochemical analyses were also conducted with intention to detect amatoxins and phalloidin in 14 representative samples.Result: Lethal amanitas were robustly supported to be a monophyletic group after excluding five species that were provisionally defined as lethal amanitas based on morphological studies. In lethal amanitas, 28 phylogenetic species were recognised by integrating molecular phylogenetic analyses with morphological studies, and 14 of them represented putatively new species. The biochemical analyses indicated a single origin of cyclic peptide toxins (amatoxins and phalloidin) within Amanita and suggested that this kind of toxins seemed to be a synapomorphy of lethal amanitas. Molecular dating through BEAST and biogeographic analyses with LAGRANGE and RASP indicated that lethal amanitas most likely originated in the Palaeotropics with the present crown group dated around 64.92 Mya in the early Paleocene, and the East Asia-eastern North America or Eurasia-North America-Central America disjunct distribution patterns were primarily established during the middle Oligocene to Miocene.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 67 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Master 5 7%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 54%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 9%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Chemistry 2 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2015.
All research outputs
#225,901
of 4,707,237 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#111
of 1,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,385
of 109,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#6
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,707,237 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,484 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 109,968 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.