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Frequency of antiseptic resistance genes in clinical staphycocci and enterococci isolates in Turkey

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, August 2017
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Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Frequency of antiseptic resistance genes in clinical staphycocci and enterococci isolates in Turkey
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13756-017-0244-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seyda Ignak, Yasar Nakipoglu, Bulent Gurler

Abstract

Disinfectants and antiseptics are biocides widely used in hospitals to prevent spread of pathogens. It has been reported that antiseptic resistance genes, qac's, caused tolerance to a variety of biocidal agents, such as benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHDG) in Staphylococcus spp. isolates. We aimed to search the frequency of antiseptic resistance genes in clinical Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. isolates to investigate the possible association with antiseptic tolerance and antibiotic resistance. Antiseptic resistance genes (qacA/B, smr, qacG, qacH, and qacJ) isolated from Gram-positive cocci (69 Staphylococcus spp. and 69 Enterococcus spp.) were analyzed by PCR method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of BAC and CHDG were determined by agar dilution method, whereas antibiotic susceptibility was analyzed by disk diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. The frequency of antiseptic resistance genes was found to be high (49/69; 71.0%) in our clinical staphylococci isolates but absent (0/69; 0%) in enterococci isolates. The frequency of qacA/B and smr genes was higher (25/40; 62.5% and 7/40; 17.5%, respectively) in coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) when compared to Staphylococcus aureus strains (3/29; 10.3%, and 4/29; 13.8%, respectively). In contrast, the frequency of qacG and qacJ genes was higher (11/29; 37.9% and 8/29; 27.5%, respectively) in S. aureus than those of CNS (5/40; 12.5%, 10/40; 25.0%) strains. qacH was not identified in none of the strains. We found an association between presence of antiseptic resistance genes and increased MIC values of BAC (>4 μg/mL) in staphylococci and it was found to be statistically statistically significant (p < 0.01). We also showed that MICs of BAC and CHDG of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates were significantly higher than those of vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE) isolates (p < 0.01). For our knowledge, our study is the first to investigate antiseptic resistance genes in enterococci and also qacG, qacH, and qacJ genes in staphylococci isolates in Turkey. Further studies are needed to revise the biocide policy and to support infection control programs to avoid the development of new resistance mechanisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 19 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2017.
All research outputs
#3,742,748
of 14,265,732 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#428
of 770 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,084
of 269,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#7
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,265,732 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 770 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,399 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.