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State of the evidence 2017: an update on the connection between breast cancer and the environment

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
122 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
458 Mendeley
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Title
State of the evidence 2017: an update on the connection between breast cancer and the environment
Published in
Environmental Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12940-017-0287-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janet M. Gray, Sharima Rasanayagam, Connie Engel, Jeanne Rizzo

Abstract

In this review, we examine the continually expanding and increasingly compelling data linking radiation and various chemicals in our environment to the current high incidence of breast cancer. Singly and in combination, these toxicants may have contributed significantly to the increasing rates of breast cancer observed over the past several decades. Exposures early in development from gestation through adolescence and early adulthood are particularly of concern as they re-shape the program of genetic, epigenetic and physiological processes in the developing mammary system, leading to an increased risk for developing breast cancer. In the 8 years since we last published a comprehensive review of the relevant literature, hundreds of new papers have appeared supporting this link, and in this update, the evidence on this topic is more extensive and of better quality than that previously available. Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, as well as a better understanding of mechanisms linking toxicants with development of breast cancer, all reinforce the conclusion that exposures to these substances - many of which are found in common, everyday products and byproducts - may lead to increased risk of developing breast cancer. Moving forward, attention to methodological limitations, especially in relevant epidemiological and animal models, will need to be addressed to allow clearer and more direct connections to be evaluated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 458 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 458 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 78 17%
Student > Bachelor 67 15%
Researcher 43 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 6%
Other 70 15%
Unknown 134 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 115 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 48 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 20 4%
Other 72 16%
Unknown 146 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 112. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2021.
All research outputs
#289,306
of 21,777,067 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#84
of 1,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,142
of 291,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,777,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,441 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,150 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them