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Metabolic syndrome and its predictors in an urban population in Kenya: A cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Endocrine Disorders, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 254)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Metabolic syndrome and its predictors in an urban population in Kenya: A cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Endocrine Disorders, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12902-017-0188-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Geoffrey Omuse, Daniel Maina, Mariza Hoffman, Jane Mwangi, Caroline Wambua, Elizabeth Kagotho, Angela Amayo, Peter Ojwang, Zulfiqarali Premji, Kiyoshi Ichihara, Rajiv Erasmus

Abstract

The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of interrelated risk factors which doubles the risk of cardio-vascular disease (CVD) in 5-10 years and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes 5 fold. The identification of modifiable CVD risk factors and predictors of MetS in an otherwise healthy population is necessary in order to identify individuals who may benefit from early interventions. We sought to determine the prevalence of MetS as defined by the harmonized criteria and its predictors in subjectively healthy black Africans from various urban centres in Kenya. We used data collected from healthy black Africans in Kenya as part of a global study on establishing reference intervals for common laboratory tests. We determined the prevalence of MetS and its components using the 2009 harmonized criterion. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the area under the curves (AUC) for various predictors of MetS. Youden index was used to determine optimum cut-offs for quantitative measurements such as waist circumference (WC). A total of 528 participants were included in the analysis. The prevalence of MetS was 25.6% (95% CI: 22.0%-29.5%). Among the surrogate markers of visceral adiposity, lipid accumulation product was the best predictor of MetS with an AUC of 0.880 while triglyceride was the best predictor among the lipid parameters with an AUC of 0.816 for all participants. The optimal WC cut-off for diagnosing MetS was 94 cm and 86 cm respectively for males and females. The prevalence of MetS was high for a healthy population highlighting the fact that one can be physically healthy but have metabolic derangements indicative of an increased CVD risk. This is likely to result in an increase in the cases of CVD and type 2 diabetes in Kenya if interventions are not put in place to reverse this trend. We have also demonstrated the inappropriateness of the WC cut-off of 80 cm for black African women in Kenya when defining MetS and recommend adoption of 86 cm.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 6 8%
Student > Master 6 8%
Lecturer 5 6%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 30 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 33 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2017.
All research outputs
#1,537,403
of 11,465,445 outputs
Outputs from BMC Endocrine Disorders
#27
of 254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,833
of 258,832 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Endocrine Disorders
#4
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,465,445 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 254 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,832 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.