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The role of Community Mobilization in maternal care provision for women in sub-Saharan Africa- A systematic review of studies using an experimental design

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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94 Mendeley
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Title
The role of Community Mobilization in maternal care provision for women in sub-Saharan Africa- A systematic review of studies using an experimental design
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1458-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Choolwe Muzyamba, Wim Groot, Sonila M. Tomini, Milena Pavlova

Abstract

While the role of community mobilization in improving maternal health outcomes of HIV positive women in sub-Saharan Africa is continuously emphasized, little is known about how legitimate these claims are. The aim of this study is to systematically review the empirical evidence on this issue. A systematic search was conducted in PuBMed, Scopus, Web of Science, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, Allied Health Literature, and Cumulative Index to Nursing. Our search identified 14 publications on the role of community mobilization in maternal care provision in sub-Saharan Africa, including both HIV negative women and women with HIV, that have used experimental research designs. Regarding HIV negative women, literature has demonstrated that community mobilization is a useful strategy for promoting both positive maternal process results and maternal health outcomes. Most of the literature on women with HIV has focused only on demonstrating the causal link between community mobilization and process results. There has been very little focus on demonstrating the causal link between community mobilization and maternal outcomes for women living with HIV. Overall, the results show that while there is some empirical evidence on a causal link between community mobilization and maternal health outcomes for HIV negative women, this kind of evidence is still missing for HIV positive women. Moreover, as shown by the studies, community mobilization as a maternal health strategy is still in its infancy. Given the gaps identified in our review, we recommend further research with the aim of providing sound evidence on the role of community mobilization in improving maternal health outcomes of women with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 17%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 20 21%
Unknown 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 19 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 16%
Social Sciences 15 16%
Unspecified 4 4%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 23 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2019.
All research outputs
#8,144,223
of 14,157,939 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,770
of 2,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,945
of 269,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,157,939 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,597 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.