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Socioeconomic position and self-harm among adolescents: a population-based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Socioeconomic position and self-harm among adolescents: a population-based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13034-017-0184-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bereket T. Lodebo, Jette Möller, Jan-Olov Larsson, Karin Engström

Abstract

Understanding the association between parental socioeconomic position and self-harm in adolescence is crucial due to its substantial magnitude and associated inequality. Most previous studies have been either of cross-sectional nature or based solely on self-reports or hospital treated self-harm. The aim of this study is to determine the association between parental socioeconomic position and self-harm among adolescents with a specific focus on gender and severity of self-harm. A total of 165,932 adolescents born 1988-1994 who lived in Stockholm at the age of 13 were followed in registers until they turned 18. Self-harm was defined as first time self-harm and severity of self-harm was defined as hospitalized or not. Socioeconomic position was defined by parental education and household income. Cox proportional hazards regression were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses showed an association between parental socioeconomic position and self-harm. Among adolescents with parents with primary and secondary education compared to tertiary parental education the HR were 1.10 (95% CI 0.97-1.24) and 1.16 (95% CI 1.08-1.25) respectively. Compared to the highest income category, adolescents from the lower income categories were 1.08 (95% CI 0.97-1.22) to 1.19 (95% CI 1.07-1.33) times more likely to self-harm. In gender-stratified analyses, an association was found only among girls. Further, restriction to severe cases eliminated the association. This study suggested that low parental socioeconomic position is associated with self-harm in adolescence, predominantly among girls. The desertion of an association among severe cases may be explained by differences in suicidal intent and underlying psychiatric diagnosis. Efforts to prevent self-harm should consider children with low parental socioeconomic position as a potential target group.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Unspecified 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 25 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 16%
Social Sciences 9 12%
Unspecified 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 26 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2017.
All research outputs
#3,798,377
of 15,922,017 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#163
of 484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,511
of 274,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,017 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 484 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,833 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them