↓ Skip to main content

Testosterone inhibits the growth of prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Testosterone inhibits the growth of prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3569-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weitao Song, Vikram Soni, Samit Soni, Mohit Khera

Abstract

Traditional beliefs of androgen's stimulating effects on the growth of prostate cancer (PCa) have been challenged in recent years. Our previous in vitro study indicated that physiological normal levels of androgens inhibited the proliferation of PCa cells. In this in vivo study, the ability of testosterone (T) to inhibit PCa growth was assessed by testing the tumor incidence rate and tumor growth rate of PCa xenografts on nude mice. Different serum testosterone levels were manipulated in male nude/nude athymic mice by orchiectomy or inserting different dosages of T pellets subcutaneously. PCa cells were injected subcutaneously to nude mice and tumor incidence rate and tumor growth rate of PCa xenografts were tested. The data demonstrated that low levels of serum T resulted in the highest PCa incidence rate (50%). This PCa incidence rate in mice with low T levels was significantly higher than that in mice treated with higher doses of T (24%, P < 0.01) and mice that underwent orchiectomy (8%, P < 0.001). Mice that had low serum T levels had the shortest tumor volume doubling time (112 h). This doubling time was significantly shorter than that in the high dose 5 mg T arm (158 h, P < 0.001) and in the orchiectomy arm (468 h, P < 0.001). These results indicated that low T levels are optimal for PCa cell growth. Castrate T levels, as seen after orchiectomy, are not sufficient to support PCa cell growth. Higher levels of serum T inhibited PCa cell growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 46%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 23%
Unspecified 1 8%
Computer Science 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,036,914
of 11,768,109 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,536
of 4,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,772
of 264,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#42
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,768,109 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,308 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,252 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.