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Does mosquito mass-rearing produce an inferior mosquito?

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Does mosquito mass-rearing produce an inferior mosquito?
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2012-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dieudonné D. Soma, Hamidou Maïga, Wadaka Mamai, Nanwintoun S. Bimbile-Somda, Nelius Venter, Adel B. Ali, Hanano Yamada, Abdoulaye Diabaté, Florence Fournet, Georges A. Ouédraogo, Rosemary S. Lees, Roch K. Dabiré, Jeremie R. L. Gilles

Abstract

The success of the sterile insect technique depends, among other things, on continuous releases of sexually competitive sterile males within the target area. Several factors (including high rearing density and physical manipulation, such as larvae and pupae separation) can influence the quality of males produced in mass-rearing facilities. The different steps in mass production in the laboratory may modify the behaviour of mosquitoes, directly or through loss of natural characters as a result of adaptation to lab rearing, and lead to the competitiveness of sterile male being reduced. In the present study, the objective was to evaluate the effect of mass-rearing conditions on sterile male sexual competitiveness in semi-field cages compared to routine small scale laboratory rearing methods. Anopheles arabiensis immature stages were reared both on a large scale using a rack and tray system developed by the FAO/IAEA (MRS), and on a small scale using standard laboratory rearing trays (SRS). Mosquito life history traits such as pupation rate, emergence rate, adult size as well as the effect of irradiation on adult longevity were evaluated. Moreover, 5-6 day old mosquitoes were released into field cages and left for two nights to mate and the mating competitiveness between sterile mass-reared males and fertile males reared on a small scale when competing for small scale reared virgin females was investigated. Resulting fertility in a treatment ratio of 1:1:1 (100 irradiated males: 100 non-irradiated males: 100 virgin females) was compared to control cages with 0:100:100 (non-irradiated control) and 100:0:100 (irradiated control). No significant differences in life history parameters were observed between rearing methods. The competitiveness index of mass reared males (0.58) was similar to males reared on a small scale (0.59). A residual fertility rate of 20% was observed in the irradiated control (100:0:100), measured as the percentage of eggs collected from the cages which developed to adulthood. No significant difference was observed (t = 0.2896, df = 4, P = 0.7865) between the rearing treatments (MRS and SRS) in the fertility rate, a measure of mating competitiveness. The results showed that the FAO/IAEA mass-rearing process did not affect mosquito life history parameters or the mating competitiveness of males.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 23%
Researcher 12 20%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 42%
Environmental Science 5 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 16 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2018.
All research outputs
#4,696,351
of 15,922,255 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,600
of 4,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,834
of 275,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,008 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them