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Self-reported eating rate is associated with weight status in a Dutch population: a validation study and a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Self-reported eating rate is associated with weight status in a Dutch population: a validation study and a cross-sectional study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0580-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janet H.W. van den Boer, Jentina Kranendonk, Anne van de Wiel, Edith J.M. Feskens, Anouk Geelen, Monica Mars

Abstract

Observational studies performed in Asian populations suggest that eating rate is related to BMI. This paper investigates the association between self-reported eating rate (SRER) and body mass index (BMI) in a Dutch population, after having validated SRER against actual eating rate. Two studies were performed; a validation and a cross-sectional study. In the validation study SRER (i.e., 'slow', 'average', or 'fast') was obtained from 57 participants (men/women = 16/41, age: mean ± SD = 22.6 ± 2.8 yrs., BMI: mean ± SD = 22.1 ± 2.8 kg/m(2)) and in these participants actual eating rate was measured for three food products. Using analysis of variance the association between SRER and actual eating rate was studied. The association between SRER and BMI was investigated in cross-sectional data from the NQplus cohort (i.e., 1473 Dutch adults; men/women = 741/732, age: mean ± SD = 54.6 ± 11.7 yrs., BMI: mean ± SD = 25.9 ± 4.0 kg/m(2)) using (multiple) linear regression analysis. In the validation study actual eating rate increased proportionally with SRER (for all three food products P < 0.01). In the cross-sectional study SRER was positively associated with BMI in both men and women (P = 0.03 and P < 0.001, respectively). Self-reported fast-eating women had a 1.13 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.43, 1.84) higher BMI compared to average-speed-eating women, after adjusting for confounders. This was not the case in men; self-reported fast-eating men had a 0.29 kg/m(2) (95% CI -0.22, 0.80) higher BMI compared to average-speed-eating men, after adjusting for confounders. These studies show that self-reported eating rate reflects actual eating rate on a group-level, and that a high self-reported eating rate is associated with a higher BMI in this Dutch population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Student > Master 6 17%
Researcher 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 11%
Sports and Recreations 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 11 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2017.
All research outputs
#4,830,515
of 16,274,718 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,236
of 1,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,323
of 275,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#11
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,274,718 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,590 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,983 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.