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The Mbd1-Atf7ip-Setdb1 pathway contributes to the maintenance of X chromosome inactivation

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, June 2014
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Title
The Mbd1-Atf7ip-Setdb1 pathway contributes to the maintenance of X chromosome inactivation
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, June 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-8935-7-12
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alissa Minkovsky, Anna Sahakyan, Elyse Rankin-Gee, Giancarlo Bonora, Sanjeet Patel, Kathrin Plath

Abstract

X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a developmental program of heterochromatin formation that initiates during early female mammalian embryonic development and is maintained through a lifetime of cell divisions in somatic cells. Despite identification of the crucial long non-coding RNA Xist and involvement of specific chromatin modifiers in the establishment and maintenance of the heterochromatin of the inactive X chromosome (Xi), interference with known pathways only partially reactivates the Xi once silencing has been established. Here, we studied ATF7IP (MCAF1), a protein previously characterized to coordinate DNA methylation and histone H3K9 methylation through interactions with the methyl-DNA binding protein MBD1 and the histone H3K9 methyltransferase SETDB1, as a candidate maintenance factor of the Xi.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 32%
Researcher 18 22%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Professor 4 5%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 6 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 6 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2014.
All research outputs
#3,227,327
of 4,035,537 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#102
of 119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,541
of 96,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,035,537 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 119 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 96,265 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.