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Weight-supported training of the upper extremity in children with cerebral palsy: a motor learning study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, August 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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131 Mendeley
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Title
Weight-supported training of the upper extremity in children with cerebral palsy: a motor learning study
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12984-017-0293-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey W. Keller, Hubertus J.A. van Hedel

Abstract

Novel neurorehabilitation technologies build upon treatment principles derived from motor learning studies. However, few studies have investigated motor learning with assistive devices in children and adolescents with Cerebral Palsy (CP). The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with CP who trained with weight support in a playful, virtual environment would improve upper extremity task performance (i.e. skill acquisition), transfer, and retention, three aspects that indicate whether motor learning might have occurred or not. Eleven children with CP (mean age 13.3 years, standard deviation 3.4 years), who were mildly to moderately impaired, participated. They played in the Armeo® Spring the exergame Moorhuhn with their more affected arm during 3 days (70 min pure play time). For this within-subject design, kinematic assessments, the Box and Block Test, and five items of the Melbourne Assessment were administered twice during a baseline week (one week before the intervention), directly before and after the intervention, and one day after the training phase (retention). The average exergame score improved from 209.55 to 339.73 (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 1.80), indicating skill acquisition. The change in the Box and Block test improved from 0.45 (baseline week) to 3.95 (intervention week; p = 0.008, d = 1.59) indicating skill transfer. The kinematic assessments and the Melbourne items did not change. Improvement in game score and Box and Bock Test persisted one day later (retention). We found evidence indicating the successful acquisition, transfer, and retention of upper extremity skills in children with CP. We therefore infer that motor learning occurred when children with CP trained their more affected arm with weight-support in a playful, virtual environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 131 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 16%
Researcher 18 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Other 7 5%
Other 21 16%
Unknown 37 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 21 16%
Engineering 15 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 9%
Computer Science 9 7%
Neuroscience 7 5%
Other 24 18%
Unknown 43 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,626,959
of 11,834,771 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#316
of 635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,181
of 265,798 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#12
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,834,771 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,798 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.