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Treatment of localized gastric and gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: the role of accurate staging and preoperative therapy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hematology & Oncology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment of localized gastric and gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma: the role of accurate staging and preoperative therapy
Published in
Journal of Hematology & Oncology, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13045-017-0517-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian Badgwell, Prajnan Das, Jaffer Ajani

Abstract

Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide, although it is not in the top 10 causes of cancer death in Northern America. Due to clear differences in incidence, screening, risk factors, tumor biology, and treatment between gastric cancers from Eastern and Western countries, our treatment is primarily guided by trials from Western countries. Patients undergo an extensive staging evaluation including high-quality CT imaging, endoscopic ultrasound, and diagnostic laparoscopy with peritoneal washings for cytology. Patients are presented in multidisciplinary conference with input from medical, radiation, and surgical oncology, in addition to further evaluation of existing studies and biopsy results by diagnostic radiology and pathology colleagues. Due to the well-documented difficulty in tolerating postoperative therapy, patients are frequently treated with preoperative chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Extended lymph node (D2) dissection is routinely performed during subtotal or total gastrectomy. Ongoing trials in Western populations comparing preoperative chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy will help inform the decision regarding the optimal treatment for patients with resectable gastric cancer. Additional studies are needed to identify predictors of treatment response to identify the optimal preoperative or perioperative approach. As peritoneal disease is the most common site of recurrence, studies are also urgently needed for more accurate methods of detecting peritoneal disease at diagnosis, and also investigating potential treatment modalities such as hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Other 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Computer Science 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 13 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2019.
All research outputs
#5,201,361
of 16,352,227 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#246
of 837 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,524
of 276,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,352,227 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 837 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them