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Excessive occupational heat exposure: a significant ergonomic challenge and health risk for current and future workers

Overview of attention for article published in Extreme Physiology & Medicine, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 103)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
226 Mendeley
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Title
Excessive occupational heat exposure: a significant ergonomic challenge and health risk for current and future workers
Published in
Extreme Physiology & Medicine, July 2014
DOI 10.1186/2046-7648-3-14
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebekah A I Lucas, Yoram Epstein, Tord Kjellstrom

Abstract

Occupational heat exposure threatens the health of a worker not only when heat illness occurs but also when a worker's performance and work capacity is impaired. Occupational contexts that involve hot and humid climatic conditions, heavy physical workloads and/or protective clothing create a strenuous and potentially dangerous thermal load for a worker. There are recognized heat prevention strategies and international thermal ergonomic standards to protect the worker. However, such standards have been developed largely in temperate western settings, and their validity and relevance is questionable for some geographical, cultural and socioeconomic contexts where the risk of excessive heat exposure can be high. There is evidence from low- and middle-income tropical countries that excessive heat exposure remains a significant issue for occupational health. Workers in these countries are likely to be at high risk of excessive heat exposure as they are densely populated, have large informal work sectors and are expected to experience substantial increases in temperature due to global climate change. The aim of this paper is to discuss current and future ergonomic risks associated with working in the heat as well as potential methods for maintaining the health and productivity of workers, particularly those most vulnerable to excessive heat exposure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 226 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Unknown 221 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 18%
Student > Master 37 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 14%
Student > Bachelor 30 13%
Other 19 8%
Other 38 17%
Unknown 30 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 38 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 15%
Engineering 30 13%
Sports and Recreations 17 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 4%
Other 58 26%
Unknown 40 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,405,825
of 16,002,285 outputs
Outputs from Extreme Physiology & Medicine
#25
of 103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,047
of 195,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Extreme Physiology & Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,002,285 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,414 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them