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Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

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114 Mendeley
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Title
Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, July 2014
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-10-60
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Gruca, Tinde R van Andel, Henrik Balslev

Abstract

Palms (Arecaceae) are prominent elements in African traditional medicines. It is, however, a challenge to find detailed information on the ritual use of palms, which are an inextricable part of African medicinal and spiritual systems. This work reviews ritual uses of palms within African ethnomedicine. We studied over 200 publications on uses of African palms and found information about ritual uses in 26 of them. At least 12 palm species in sub-Saharan Africa are involved in various ritual practices: Borassus aethiopum, Cocos nucifera, Dypsis canaliculata, D. fibrosa, D. pinnatifrons, Elaeis guineensis, Hyphaene coriacea, H. petersiana, Phoenix reclinata, Raphia farinifera, R. hookeri, and R. vinifera. In some rituals, palms play a central role as sacred objects, for example the seeds accompany oracles and palm leaves are used in offerings. In other cases, palms are added as a support to other powerful ingredients, for example palm oil used as a medium to blend and make coherent the healing mixture. A better understanding of the cultural context of medicinal use of palms is needed in order to obtain a more accurate and complete insight into palm-based traditional medicines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Zimbabwe 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Mauritius 1 <1%
Benin 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Iraq 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 105 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Postgraduate 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 27 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 19%
Environmental Science 15 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 8%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 26 23%
Unknown 32 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2022.
All research outputs
#3,062,940
of 22,491,736 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#93
of 725 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,092
of 209,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,491,736 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 725 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them