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The intelligence paradox; will ET get the metabolic syndrome? Lessons from and for Earth

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
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Title
The intelligence paradox; will ET get the metabolic syndrome? Lessons from and for Earth
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-11-34
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alistair V W Nunn, Geoffrey W Guy, Jimmy D Bell

Abstract

Mankind is facing an unprecedented health challenge in the current pandemic of obesity and diabetes. We propose that this is the inevitable (and predictable) consequence of the evolution of intelligence, which itself could be an expression of life being an information system driven by entropy. Because of its ability to make life more adaptable and robust, intelligence evolved as an efficient adaptive response to the stresses arising from an ever-changing environment. These adaptive responses are encapsulated by the epiphenomena of "hormesis", a phenomenon we believe to be central to the evolution of intelligence and essential for the maintenance of optimal physiological function and health. Thus, as intelligence evolved, it would eventually reach a cognitive level with the ability to control its environment through technology and have the ability remove all stressors. In effect, it would act to remove the very hormetic factors that had driven its evolution. Mankind may have reached this point, creating an environmental utopia that has reduced the very stimuli necessary for optimal health and the evolution of intelligence - "the intelligence paradox". One of the hallmarks of this paradox is of course the rising incidence in obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. This leads to the conclusion that wherever life evolves, here on earth or in another part of the galaxy, the "intelligence paradox" would be the inevitable side-effect of the evolution of intelligence. ET may not need to just "phone home" but may also need to "phone the local gym". This suggests another possible reason to explain Fermi's paradox; Enrico Fermi, the famous physicist, suggested in the 1950s that if extra-terrestrial intelligence was so prevalent, which was a common belief at the time, then where was it? Our suggestion is that if advanced life has got going elsewhere in our galaxy, it can't afford to explore the galaxy because it has to pay its healthcare costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 62 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Researcher 11 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 9%
Other 6 9%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Sports and Recreations 4 6%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 65. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2021.
All research outputs
#448,807
of 19,432,554 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#82
of 877 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,202
of 204,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,432,554 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 877 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,487 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them