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Mast cells in a murine lung ischemia-reperfusion model of primary graft dysfunction

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Research, August 2014
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
Mast cells in a murine lung ischemia-reperfusion model of primary graft dysfunction
Published in
Respiratory Research, August 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12931-014-0095-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

John R Greenland, Xiang Xu, David M Sayah, Feng Chun Liu, Kirk D Jones, Mark R Looney, George H Caughey

Abstract

Primary graft dysfunction (PGD), as characterized by pulmonary infiltrates and high oxygen requirements shortly after reperfusion, is the major cause of early morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Donor, recipient and allograft-handling factors are thought to contribute, although new insights regarding pathogenesis are needed to guide approaches to prevention and therapy. Mast cells have been implicated in ischemic tissue injury in other model systems and in allograft rejection, leading to the hypothesis that mast cell degranulation contributes to lung injury following reperfusion injury.We tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of PGD involving reversible disruption of blood flow to one lung. Metrics of injury included albumin permeability, plasma extravasation, lung histopathology, and mast cell degranulation. Responses were assessed in wild-type (Kit+/+) and mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice. Because mouse lungs have few mast cells compared with human lungs, we also tested responses in mice with lung mastocytosis generated by injecting bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMCMC).We found that ischemic lung responses of mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice did not differ from those of Kit+/+ mice, even after priming for injury using LPS. Degranulated mast cells were more abundant in ischemic than in non-ischemic BMCMC-injected KitW-sh/W-sh lungs. However, lung injury in BMCMC-injected KitW-sh/W-sh and Kit+/+ mice did not differ in globally mast cell-deficient, uninjected KitW-sh/W-sh mice or in wild-type Kit+/+ mice relatively deficient in lung mast cells.These findings predict that mast cells, although activated in lungs injured by ischemia and reperfusion, are not necessary for the development of PGD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Professor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 7 33%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 48%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2014.
All research outputs
#14,783,695
of 22,760,687 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Research
#1,811
of 2,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,039
of 231,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Research
#28
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,760,687 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,741 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,132 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.