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Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from animal studies

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2014
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Title
Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: lessons from animal studies
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/ar4450
Pubmed ID
Authors

Perle Totoson, Katy Maguin-Gaté, Clément Prati, Daniel Wendling, Céline Demougeot

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 30% to 50% of all deaths. In patients with RA, atherosclerosis lesions occur earlier and have a more rapid evolution than in the general population. Beyond mortality, the impact of CVD on quality of life, combined with the associated increase in health-care costs, renders CVD in RA a major public health problem. Recent studies showed that patients with RA are characterized by the presence of endothelial dysfunction (ED), which is recognized as a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. By definition, ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state and proliferative and prothrombotic properties. Although the improvement of endothelial function is becoming an important element of the global management of patients with RA, the mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. Animal models of RA provide the unique opportunity to unravel the pathophysiological features of ED in RA. The present review summarizes the available data on mechanisms underlying ED in animal models of RA and proposes attractive prospects in order to discover novel therapeutic strategies of RA-associated ED.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 40%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2014.
All research outputs
#3,053,931
of 4,507,652 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#800
of 1,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,872
of 111,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#26
of 38 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.