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Brachyury cooperates with Wnt/β-catenin signalling to elicit primitive-streak-like behaviour in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
173 Mendeley
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Title
Brachyury cooperates with Wnt/β-catenin signalling to elicit primitive-streak-like behaviour in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells
Published in
BMC Biology, August 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12915-014-0063-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

David A Turner, Pau Rué, Jonathan P Mackenzie, Eleanor Davies, Alfonso Martinez Arias

Abstract

BackgroundThe formation of the Primitive Streak is the first visible sign of gastrulation, the process by which the three germ layers are formed from a single epithelium during early development. Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) provide a good system to understand the molecular and cellular events associated with these processes. Previous work, both in embryos and in culture, has shown how converging signals from both Nodal/TGFßR and Wnt/ß-Catenin signalling pathways specify cells to adopt a Primitive Streak like fate and direct them to undertake an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, many of these approaches have relied on genetic analyses without taking into account the temporal progression of events within single cells. In addition, it is still unclear as to what extent events in the embryo are able to be reproduced in culture.ResultsHere, we combine flow-cytometry and a quantitative live single-cell imaging approach to demonstrate how the controlled differentiation of mouse ESCs (mESCs) towards a Primitive Streak fate in culture results in cells displaying many of the characteristics observed during early mouse development including transient Brachyury expression, EMT and increased motility. We also find that the EMT initiates the process, and this is both fuelled and terminated by the action of Bra, whose expression is dependent on the EMT and ß-Catenin activity.ConclusionsAs a consequence of our analysis, we propose that a major output of Brachyury expression is in controlling the velocity of the cells that are transiting out of the Primitive Streak.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 173 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
United States 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 168 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 33%
Student > Master 30 17%
Researcher 28 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 5%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 14 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 60 35%
Neuroscience 7 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 4%
Engineering 6 3%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 15 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2020.
All research outputs
#4,232,946
of 21,338,015 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#999
of 1,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,025
of 214,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,338,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,837 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 214,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.