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Barriers and facilitators to implementing addiction medicine fellowships: a qualitative study with fellows, medical students, residents and preceptors

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, September 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers and facilitators to implementing addiction medicine fellowships: a qualitative study with fellows, medical students, residents and preceptors
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13722-017-0086-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Klimas, W. Small, K. Ahamad, W. Cullen, A. Mead, L. Rieb, E. Wood, R. McNeil

Abstract

Although progress in science has driven advances in addiction medicine, this subject has not been adequately taught to medical trainees and physicians. As a result, there has been poor integration of evidence-based practices in addiction medicine into physician training which has impeded addiction treatment and care. Recently, a number of training initiatives have emerged internationally, including the addiction medicine fellowships in Vancouver, Canada. This study was undertaken to examine barriers and facilitators of implementing addiction medicine fellowships. We interviewed trainees and faculty from clinical and research training programmes in addiction medicine at St Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, Canada (N = 26) about barriers and facilitators to implementation of physician training in addiction medicine. We included medical students, residents, fellows and supervising physicians from a variety of specialities. We analysed interview transcripts thematically by using NVivo software. We identified six domains relating to training implementation: (1) organisational, (2) structural, (3) teacher, (4) learner, (5) patient and (6) community related variables either hindered or fostered addiction medicine education, depending on context. Human resources, variety of rotations, peer support and mentoring fostered implementation of addiction training. Money, time and space limitations hindered implementation. Participant accounts underscored how faculty and staff facilitated the implementation of both the clinical and the research training. Implementation of addiction medicine fellowships appears feasible, although a number of barriers exist. Research into factors within the local/practice environment that shape delivery of education to ensure consistent and quality education scale-up is a priority.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 25%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 16%
Social Sciences 8 13%
Psychology 4 6%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 18 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2018.
All research outputs
#4,029,384
of 15,922,017 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#120
of 292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,014
of 277,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,017 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them