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A qualitative study to identify parents’ perceptions of and barriers to asthma management in children from South Asian and White British families

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative study to identify parents’ perceptions of and barriers to asthma management in children from South Asian and White British families
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12890-017-0464-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monica Lakhanpaul, Lorraine Culley, Noelle Robertson, Deborah Bird, Nicky Hudson, Narynder Johal, Melanie McFeeters, Emma Angell, Charlotte Hamlyn-Williams, Nadine Abbas, Logan Manikam, Mark Johnson

Abstract

Over one million children receive treatment for asthma in the UK. South Asian children experience excess morbidity and higher rates of hospitalization than the White population. This study aimed to explore perceptions and experiences of asthma and asthma management in British South Asian and White British families, to identify barriers to optimal management and to inform culturally appropriate interventions to improve management. A qualitative methodology, using semi-structured interviews was adopted. Members of 30 families from six major South Asian ethnic-religious groups were purposively sampled (n = 49). For comparison, 17 White British parents were interviewed. Topics included understandings of asthma; day-to-day management; interactions with health care providers and the perceived quality of healthcare services. Data were analyzed using interpretive thematic analysis, facilitated by NVivo. Similarities and differences between South Asian and White families were analysed across key themes. Many of the problems facing families of a child with asthma were common to South Asian and White British families. Both had limited understanding of asthma causes and triggers and expressed confusion about the use of medications. Both groups reported delays in receiving a clear diagnosis and many experienced what was perceived as uncoordinated care and inconsistent advice from health professionals. No family had received an asthma plan. South Asian families had more difficulty in recognising severity of symptoms and those with limited English faced additional barriers to receiving adequate information and advice about management due to poor communication support systems. South Asian parents reported higher levels of involvement of wider family and higher levels of stigma. Attendance at the emergency department was related to previous experience, difficulties in accessing primary care, lack of knowledge of alternatives and difficulties in assessing severity. Barriers to optimal asthma management exist at the individual family, community and healthcare systems levels. Culturally sensitive, holistic and collaboratively designed interventions are needed. Improved communication support for families with lower proficiency in English is required. Healthcare professionals need to ensure that families receive an asthma plan and make greater efforts to check families' understandings of asthma triggers, use of medications, assessment of asthma severity and accessing help.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 81 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 24 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 15%
Psychology 7 9%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 28 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#8,100,819
of 14,995,047 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#426
of 1,230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,566
of 274,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,995,047 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,230 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them