↓ Skip to main content

Article

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2004
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
171 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
216 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2004
DOI 10.1186/1476-072x-3-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maged Boulos

Abstract

The term "Geographic Information Systems" (GIS) has been added to MeSH in 2003, a step reflecting the importance and growing use of GIS in health and healthcare research and practices. GIS have much more to offer than the obvious digital cartography (map) functions. From a community health perspective, GIS could potentially act as powerful evidence-based practice tools for early problem detection and solving. When properly used, GIS can: inform and educate (professionals and the public); empower decision-making at all levels; help in planning and tweaking clinically and cost-effective actions, in predicting outcomes before making any financial commitments and ascribing priorities in a climate of finite resources; change practices; and continually monitor and analyse changes, as well as sentinel events. Yet despite all these potentials for GIS, they remain under-utilised in the UK National Health Service (NHS). This paper has the following objectives: (1) to illustrate with practical, real-world scenarios and examples from the literature the different GIS methods and uses to improve community health and healthcare practices, e.g., for improving hospital bed availability, in community health and bioterrorism surveillance services, and in the latest SARS outbreak; (2) to discuss challenges and problems currently hindering the wide-scale adoption of GIS across the NHS; and (3) to identify the most important requirements and ingredients for addressing these challenges, and realising GIS potential within the NHS, guided by related initiatives worldwide. The ultimate goal is to illuminate the road towards implementing a comprehensive national, multi-agency spatio-temporal health information infrastructure functioning proactively in real time. The concepts and principles presented in this paper can be also applied in other countries, and on regional (e.g., European Union) and global levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 216 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United Arab Emirates 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 199 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 49 23%
Researcher 42 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Professor 13 6%
Other 44 20%
Unknown 17 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 18%
Social Sciences 35 16%
Environmental Science 28 13%
Computer Science 24 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 6%
Other 53 25%
Unknown 24 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2014.
All research outputs
#2,355,384
of 4,195,183 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#160
of 259 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,775
of 108,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#9
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,195,183 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 259 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 108,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.