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An epigenome-wide association study in whole blood of measures of adiposity among Ghanaians: the RODAM study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, September 2017
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Title
An epigenome-wide association study in whole blood of measures of adiposity among Ghanaians: the RODAM study
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0403-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karlijn A.C. Meeks, Peter Henneman, Andrea Venema, Tom Burr, Cecilia Galbete, Ina Danquah, Matthias B. Schulze, Frank P. Mockenhaupt, Ellis Owusu-Dabo, Charles N. Rotimi, Juliet Addo, Liam Smeeth, Silver Bahendeka, Joachim Spranger, Marcel M.A.M. Mannens, Mohammad H. Zafarmand, Charles Agyemang, Adebowale Adeyemo, Karlijn A.C. Meeks, Peter Henneman, Andrea Venema, Tom Burr, Cecilia Galbete, Ina Danquah, Matthias B. Schulze, Frank P. Mockenhaupt, Ellis Owusu-Dabo, Charles N. Rotimi, Juliet Addo, Liam Smeeth, Silver Bahendeka, Joachim Spranger, Marcel M.A.M. Mannens, Mohammad H. Zafarmand, Charles Agyemang, Adebowale Adeyemo

Abstract

Epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) have identified DNA methylation loci involved in adiposity. However, EWAS on adiposity in sub-Saharan Africans are lacking despite the high burden of adiposity among African populations. We undertook an EWAS for anthropometric indices of adiposity among Ghanaians aiming to identify DNA methylation loci that are significantly associated. The Illumina 450k DNA methylation array was used to profile DNA methylation in whole blood samples of 547 Ghanaians from the Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study. Differentially methylated positions (DMPs) and differentially methylation regions (DMRs) were identified for BMI and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), as well as for waist circumference (WC) and abdominal obesity (WC ≥ 102 cm in men, ≥88 cm in women). All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, blood cell distribution estimates, technical covariates, recruitment site and population stratification. We also did a replication study of previously reported EWAS loci for anthropometric indices in other populations. We identified 18 DMPs for BMI and 23 for WC. For obesity and abdominal obesity, we identified three and one DMP, respectively. Fourteen DMPs overlapped between BMI and WC. DMP cg00574958 annotated to gene CPT1A was the only DMP associated with all outcomes analysed, attributing to 6.1 and 5.6% of variance in obesity and abdominal obesity, respectively. DMP cg07839457 (NLRC5) and cg20399616 (BCAT1) were significantly associated with BMI, obesity and with WC and had not been reported by previous EWAS on adiposity. This first EWAS for adiposity in Africans identified three epigenome-wide significant loci (CPT1A, NLRC5 and BCAT1) for both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity. The findings are a first step in understanding the role of DNA methylation in adiposity among sub-Saharan Africans. Studies on other sub-Saharan African populations as well as translational studies are needed to determine the role of these DNA methylation variants in the high burden of adiposity among sub-Saharan Africans.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Master 5 8%
Professor 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 14 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 21 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2017.
All research outputs
#10,465,250
of 11,805,455 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#496
of 543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#226,386
of 267,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#17
of 33 outputs
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