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Human resources for health in Peru: recent trends (2007–2013) in the labour market for physicians, nurses and midwives

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
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Title
Human resources for health in Peru: recent trends (2007–2013) in the labour market for physicians, nurses and midwives
Published in
Human Resources for Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12960-017-0243-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Michelle Jimenez, Anthony L. Bui, Eduardo Mantilla, J. Jaime Miranda

Abstract

Most analyses of gaps in human resources for health (HRH) do not consider training and the transition of graduates into the labour market. This study aims to explore the labour market for Peru's recent medical, nursing, and midwifery graduates as well as their transition into employment in the Ministry of Health's (MOH) system. Data from four different datasets, covering 2007-2013, was used to characterize the patterns of recently trained physicians, nurses, midwives, and postgraduate-trained physicians that enter employment in the MOH system, and scenario analyses were used to describe how this rate of entry needs to adapt in order to fill current HRH shortages. HRH graduates have been increasing from 2007 to 2011, but the proportions that enter employment in the MOH system 2 years later range from 8 to 45% and less than 10% of newly trained medical specialists. Scenario analyses indicate that the gap for physicians and nurses will be met in 2027 and 2024, respectively, while midwives in 2017. However, if the number of HRH graduates entering the MOH system doubles, these gaps could be filled as early as 2020 for physicians and 2019 for nurses. In this latter scenario, the MOH system would still only utilize 56% of newly qualified physicians, 74% of nurses, and 66% of midwives available in the labour market. At 2013 training rates, Peru has the number of physicians, nurses, and midwives it needs to address HRH shortages and meet estimated HRH gaps in the national MOH system during the next decade. However, a significant number of newly qualified health professionals do not work for the MOH system within 2 years of graduation. These analyses highlight the importance of building adequate incentive structures to improve the entry and retention of HRH into the public sector.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 111 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer 20 18%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Master 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Student > Bachelor 6 5%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 30 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 18%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 38 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,821,868
of 20,535,273 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#360
of 1,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,478
of 292,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,535,273 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,073 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,974 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.