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Neurocognitive and observational markers: prediction of autism spectrum disorder from infancy to mid-childhood

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
21 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
137 Mendeley
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Title
Neurocognitive and observational markers: prediction of autism spectrum disorder from infancy to mid-childhood
Published in
Molecular Autism, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13229-017-0167-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachael Bedford, Teodora Gliga, Elizabeth Shephard, Mayada Elsabbagh, Andrew Pickles, Tony Charman, Mark H. Johnson

Abstract

Prospective studies of infants at high familial risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have identified a number of putative early markers that are associated with ASD outcome at 3 years of age. However, some diagnostic changes occur between toddlerhood and mid-childhood, which raises the question of whether infant markers remain associated with diagnosis into mid-childhood. First, we tested whether infant neurocognitive markers (7-month neural response to eye gaze shifts and 14-month visual disengagement latencies) as well as an observational marker of emerging ASD behaviours (the Autism Observation Scale for Infants; AOSI) predicted ASD outcome in high-risk (HR) 7-year-olds with and without an ASD diagnosis (HR-ASD and HR-No ASD) and low risk (LR) controls. Second, we tested whether the neurocognitive markers offer predictive power over and above the AOSI. Both neurocognitive markers distinguished children with an ASD diagnosis at 7 years of age from those in the HR-No ASD and LR groups. Exploratory analysis suggested that neurocognitive markers may further differentiate stable versus lost/late diagnosis across the 3 to 7 year period, which will need to be tested in larger samples. At both 7 and 14 months, combining the neurocognitive marker with the AOSI offered a significantly improved model fit over the AOSI alone. Infant neurocognitive markers relate to ASD in mid-childhood, improving predictive power over and above an early observational marker. The findings have implications for understanding the neurodevelopmental mechanisms that lead from risk to disorder and for identification of potential targets of pre-emptive intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 137 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 18%
Researcher 16 12%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 9%
Other 27 20%
Unknown 18 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 59 43%
Neuroscience 17 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 6%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 25 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2020.
All research outputs
#1,244,703
of 19,146,896 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#140
of 614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,461
of 289,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,146,896 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,074 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them