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Assessing vocal performance in complex birdsong: a novel approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
95 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing vocal performance in complex birdsong: a novel approach
Published in
BMC Biology, August 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12915-014-0058-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole Geberzahn, Thierry Aubin

Abstract

BackgroundVocal performance refers to the ability to produce vocal signals close to physical limits. Such motor skills can be used by conspecifics to assess a signaller¿s competitive potential. For example it is difficult for birds to produce repeated syllables both rapidly and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Deviation from an upper-bound regression of frequency bandwidth on trill rate has been widely used to assess vocal performance. This approach is, however, only applicable to simple trilled songs, and even then may be affected by differences in syllable complexity.ResultsUsing skylarks (Alauda arvensis) as a birdsong model with a very complex song structure, we detected another performance trade-off: minimum gap duration between syllables was longer when the frequency ratio between the end of one syllable and the start of the next syllable (inter-syllable frequency shift) was large. This allowed us to apply a novel measure of vocal performance ¿ vocal gap deviation: the deviation from a lower-bound regression of gap duration on inter-syllable frequency shift. We show that skylarks increase vocal performance in an aggressive context suggesting that this trait might serve as a signal for competitive potential.ConclusionsWe suggest using vocal gap deviation in future studies to assess vocal performance in songbird species with complex structure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Canada 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 90 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 22%
Student > Master 19 20%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 12 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 56%
Environmental Science 11 12%
Psychology 6 6%
Neuroscience 2 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2014.
All research outputs
#2,434,264
of 21,338,015 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#700
of 1,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,230
of 215,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#2
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,338,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,837 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,646 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.