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Assessment of the effect of larval source management and house improvement on malaria transmission when added to standard malaria control strategies in southern Malawi: study protocol for a cluster-ran…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

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163 Mendeley
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Title
Assessment of the effect of larval source management and house improvement on malaria transmission when added to standard malaria control strategies in southern Malawi: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2749-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert S. McCann, Henk van den Berg, Peter J. Diggle, Michèle van Vugt, Dianne J. Terlouw, Kamija S. Phiri, Aurelio Di Pasquale, Nicolas Maire, Steven Gowelo, Monicah M. Mburu, Alinune N. Kabaghe, Themba Mzilahowa, Michael G. Chipeta, Willem Takken

Abstract

Due to outdoor and residual transmission and insecticide resistance, long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) will be insufficient as stand-alone malaria vector control interventions in many settings as programmes shift toward malaria elimination. Combining additional vector control interventions as part of an integrated strategy would potentially overcome these challenges. Larval source management (LSM) and structural house improvements (HI) are appealing as additional components of an integrated vector management plan because of their long histories of use, evidence on effectiveness in appropriate settings, and unique modes of action compared to LLINs and IRS. Implementation of LSM and HI through a community-based approach could provide a path for rolling-out these interventions sustainably and on a large scale. We will implement community-based LSM and HI, as additional interventions to the current national malaria control strategies, using a randomised block, 2 × 2 factorial, cluster-randomised design in rural, southern Malawi. These interventions will be continued for two years. The trial catchment area covers about 25,000 people living in 65 villages. Community participation is encouraged by training community volunteers as health animators, and supporting the organisation of village-level committees in collaboration with The Hunger Project, a non-governmental organisation. Household-level cross-sectional surveys, including parasitological and entomological sampling, will be conducted on a rolling, 2-monthly schedule to measure outcomes over two years (2016 to 2018). Coverage of LSM and HI will also be assessed throughout the trial area. Combining LSM and/or HI together with the interventions currently implemented by the Malawi National Malaria Control Programme is anticipated to reduce malaria transmission below the level reached by current interventions alone. Implementation of LSM and HI through a community-based approach provides an opportunity for optimum adaptation to the local ecological and social setting, and enhances the potential for sustainability. Registered with The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry on 3 March 2016, trial number PACTR201604001501493.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 163 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 163 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 17%
Researcher 26 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 11%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Student > Postgraduate 11 7%
Other 23 14%
Unknown 44 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 4%
Other 39 24%
Unknown 47 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,074,707
of 11,823,407 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,800
of 4,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,065
of 269,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#54
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,823,407 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,411 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.