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Small non-coding RNA signature in multiple sclerosis patients after treatment with interferon-beta.

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, May 2014
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Title
Small non-coding RNA signature in multiple sclerosis patients after treatment with interferon-beta.
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, May 2014
DOI 10.1186/1755-8794-7-26
Pubmed ID
Authors

De Felice B, Mondola P, Sasso A, Orefice G, Bresciamorra V, Vacca G, Biffali E, Borra M, Pannone R

Abstract

Non-coding small RNA molecules play pivotal roles in cellular and developmental processes by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In human diseases, the roles of the non-coding small RNAs in specific degradation or translational suppression of the targeted mRNAs suggest a potential therapeutic approach of post-transcriptional gene silencing that targets the underlying disease etiology. The involvement of non-coding small RNAs in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's , Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis has been demonstrated. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, characterized by chronic inflammation, demyelination and scarring as well as a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms. The current standard treatment for SM is interferon ß (IFNß) that is less than ideal due to side effects. In this study we administered the standard IFN-ß treatment to Relapsing-Remitting MS patients, all responder to the therapy; then examined their sncRNA expression profiles in order to identify the ncRNAs that were associated with MS patients' response to IFNß.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 63 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 23%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Neuroscience 7 11%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2014.
All research outputs
#18,967,582
of 21,326,395 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#942
of 1,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,552
of 215,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#2
of 2 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,135 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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