↓ Skip to main content

Is cytotoxicity a determinant of the different in vitro and in vivo effects of bioactives?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies, September 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Is cytotoxicity a determinant of the different in vitro and in vivo effects of bioactives?
Published in
BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1962-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mattia Di Nunzio, Veronica Valli, Lidia Tomás-Cobos, Teresa Tomás-Chisbert, Lucía Murgui-Bosch, Francesca Danesi, Alessandra Bordoni

Abstract

Foodstuffs of both plant and animal origin contain a wide range of bioactive compounds. Although human intervention studies are mandatory to assess the health effects of bioactives, the in vitro approach is often used to select the most promising molecules to be studied in vivo. To avoid misleading results, concentration and chemical form, exposure time, and potential cytotoxicity of the tested bioactives should be carefully set prior to any other experiments. In this study the possible cytotoxicity of different bioactives (docosahexaenoic acid, propionate, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, protocatechuic acid), was investigated in HepG2 cells using different methods. Bioactives were supplemented to cells at different concentrations within the physiological range in human blood, alone or in combination, considering two different exposure times. Reported data clearly evidence that in vitro cytotoxicity is tightly related to the exposure time, and it varies among bioactives, which could exert a cytotoxic effect even at a concentration within the in vivo physiological blood concentration range. Furthermore, co-supplementation of different bioactives can increase the cytotoxic effect. Our results underline the importance of in vitro cytotoxicity screening that should be considered mandatory before performing studies aimed to evaluate the effect of bioactives on other cellular parameters. Although this study is far from the demonstration of a toxic effect of the tested bioactives when administered to humans, it represents a starting point for future research aimed at verifying the existence of a potential hazard due to the wide use of high doses of multiple bioactives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Unspecified 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2017.
All research outputs
#18,174,053
of 22,489,892 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies
#2,319
of 3,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,266
of 293,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,489,892 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,303 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,453 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them