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Liver transcriptome analysis in gilthead sea bream upon exposure to low temperature

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, September 2014
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1 tweeter

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Liver transcriptome analysis in gilthead sea bream upon exposure to low temperature
Published in
BMC Genomics, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-15-765
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alba N Mininni, Massimo Milan, Serena Ferraresso, Tommaso Petochi, Patrizia Di Marco, Giovanna Marino, Silvia Livi, Chiara Romualdi, Luca Bargelloni, Tomaso Patarnello

Abstract

Water temperature greatly influences the physiology and behaviour of teleost fish as other aquatic organisms. While fish are able to cope with seasonal temperature variations, thermal excursions outside their normal thermal range might exceed their ability to respond leading to severe diseases and death.Profound differences exist in thermal tolerance across fish species living in the same geographical areas, promoting for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in susceptibility and resistance to low and high temperatures toward a better understanding of adaptation to environmental challenges. The gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata, is particularly sensitive to cold and the prolonged exposure to low temperatures may lead to the "winter disease", a metabolic disorder that significantly affects the aquaculture productions along the Northern Mediterranean coasts during winter-spring season. While sea bream susceptibility to low temperatures has been extensively investigated, the cascade of molecular events under such stressful condition is not fully elucidated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 27%
Researcher 17 19%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Student > Postgraduate 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 20 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 13%
Unspecified 5 6%
Environmental Science 4 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 24 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2014.
All research outputs
#20,236,620
of 22,763,032 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#9,264
of 10,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,100
of 238,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#174
of 193 outputs
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