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The presence of nitrate dramatically changed the predominant microbial community in perchlorate degrading cultures under saline conditions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, September 2014
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Title
The presence of nitrate dramatically changed the predominant microbial community in perchlorate degrading cultures under saline conditions
Published in
BMC Microbiology, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12866-014-0225-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Victor G Stepanov, Yeyuan Xiao, Quyen Tran, Mark Rojas, Richard C Willson, Yuriy Fofanov, George E Fox, Deborah J Roberts

Abstract

BackgroundPerchlorate contamination has been detected in both ground water and drinking water. An attractive treatment option is the use of ion-exchange to remove and concentrate perchlorate in brine. Biological treatment can subsequently remove the perchlorate from the brine. When nitrate is present, it will also be concentrated in the brine and must also be removed by biological treatment. The primary objective was to obtain an in-depth characterization of the microbial populations of two salt-tolerant cultures each of which is capable of metabolizing perchlorate. The cultures were derived from a single ancestral culture and have been maintained in the laboratory for more than 10 years. One culture was fed perchlorate only, while the other was fed both perchlorate and nitrate.ResultsA metagenomic characterization was performed using Illumina DNA sequencing technology, and the 16S rDNA of several pure strains isolated from the mixed cultures were sequenced. In the absence of nitrate, members of the Rhodobacteraceae constituted the prevailing taxonomic group. Second in abundance were the Rhodocyclaceae. In the nitrate fed culture, the Rhodobacteraceae are essentially absent. They are replaced by a major expansion of the Rhodocyclaceae and the emergence of the Alteromonadaceae as a significant community member. Gene sequences exhibiting significant homology to known perchlorate and nitrate reduction enzymes were found in both cultures.ConclusionsThe structure of the two microbial ecosystems of interest has been established and some representative strains obtained in pure culture. The results illustrate that under favorable conditions a group of organisms can readily dominate an ecosystem and yet be effectively eliminated when their advantage is lost. Almost all known perchlorate-reducing organisms can also effectively reduce nitrate. This is certainly not the case for the Rhodobacteraceae that were found to dominate in the absence of nitrate, but effectively disappeared in its presence. This study is significant in that it reveals the existence of a novel group of organisms that play a role in the reduction of perchlorate under saline conditions. These Rhodobacteraceae especially, as well as other organisms present in these communities may be a promising source of unique salt-tolerant enzymes for perchlorate reduction.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Student > Master 5 14%
Other 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 29%
Environmental Science 6 17%
Engineering 6 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2014.
All research outputs
#9,905,539
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,252
of 1,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,542
of 205,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#6
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,804 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.