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A Public Health initiative on hepatitis E virus epidemiology, safety and control in Portugal – study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
A Public Health initiative on hepatitis E virus epidemiology, safety and control in Portugal – study protocol
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1341-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

João R. Mesquita, Mette Myrmel, Kathrine Stene-Johansen, Joakim Øverbø, Maria S. J. Nascimento

Abstract

The discovery of autochthonous hepatitis E in industrialized countries has changed the understanding of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in these regions, now known to be mainly due to zoonotic transmission of genotype 3. The foodborne route of transmission via consumption of contaminated meat from HEV infected pigs is well documented as well as the direct occupational exposure to animal reservoirs. Accumulating evidence also points to an emerging potential threat to blood safety after the identification of viremic blood donors and the documentation of HEV-contaminated blood or blood products. Moreover, the origin of several iatrogenic cases remains unclear and porcine-derived pharmaceutic products have been suspected as a cause. Severe morbidity following HEV infection in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy and in those with severe immunodeficiency from other causes has been recently recognized as a serious consequence of this infection in industrialized countries. In Portugal no large-scale HEV seroprevalence study has been undertaken, no professional risk groups have been identified, and the risk of blood donation from HEV silent infected donors is unknown. The present paper describes seroepidemiological and molecular approaches to answer these questions. To address these issues a study protocol was designed that will approach: i) the seroprevalence of HEV among the Portuguese general population; ii) HEV infection among butchers and slaughterhouse workers (occupational risk); iii) the silent HEV infection in Portuguese blood donors (HEV transfusion-associated risk); iv) the potential HEV contamination of porcine-derived pharmaceutical products. Commercial enzyme immunoassays and real-time/conventional RT-PCR assays will be used. This study is the first evaluation of the seroepidemiological status to HEV infection of the Portuguese population, the first to potentially identify professional risk groups, and to evaluate the safety of blood and blood products and porcine-derived pharmaceutics in Portugal. It will generate valuable data applicable for preventive and control measures against HEV infection (e.g., introduction of systematic screening of blood donors, control of blood products or porcine derived pharmaceutical products), thus helping to manage the burden of this viral disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 20%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 8%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,372,044
of 11,834,771 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,437
of 4,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,755
of 270,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#52
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,834,771 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,415 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,249 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.