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Towards new recommendations to reduce the burden of alcohol-induced hypertension in the European Union

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
29 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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105 Mendeley
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Title
Towards new recommendations to reduce the burden of alcohol-induced hypertension in the European Union
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0934-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jürgen Rehm, Peter Anderson, Jose Angel Arbesu Prieto, Iain Armstrong, Henri-Jean Aubin, Michael Bachmann, Nuria Bastida Bastus, Carlos Brotons, Robyn Burton, Manuel Cardoso, Joan Colom, Daniel Duprez, Gerrit Gmel, Antoni Gual, Ludwig Kraus, Reinhold Kreutz, Helena Liira, Jakob Manthey, Lars Møller, Ľubomír Okruhlica, Michael Roerecke, Emanuele Scafato, Bernd Schulte, Lidia Segura-Garcia, Kevin David Shield, Cristina Sierra, Konstantin Vyshinskiy, Marcin Wojnar, José Zarco

Abstract

Hazardous and harmful alcohol use and high blood pressure are central risk factors related to premature non-communicable disease (NCD) mortality worldwide. A reduction in the prevalence of both risk factors has been suggested as a route to reach the global NCD targets. This study aims to highlight that screening and interventions for hypertension and hazardous and harmful alcohol use in primary healthcare can contribute substantially to achieving the NCD targets. A consensus conference based on systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical guidelines, experimental studies, and statistical modelling which had been presented and discussed in five preparatory meetings, was undertaken. Specifically, we modelled changes in blood pressure distributions and potential lives saved for the five largest European countries if screening and appropriate intervention rates in primary healthcare settings were increased. Recommendations to handle alcohol-induced hypertension in primary healthcare settings were derived at the conference, and their degree of evidence was graded. Screening and appropriate interventions for hazardous alcohol use and use disorders could lower blood pressure levels, but there is a lack in implementing these measures in European primary healthcare. Recommendations included (1) an increase in screening for hypertension (evidence grade: high), (2) an increase in screening and brief advice on hazardous and harmful drinking for people with newly detected hypertension by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals (evidence grade: high), (3) the conduct of clinical management of less severe alcohol use disorders for incident people with hypertension in primary healthcare (evidence grade: moderate), and (4) screening for alcohol use in hypertension that is not well controlled (evidence grade: moderate). The first three measures were estimated to result in a decreased hypertension prevalence and hundreds of saved lives annually in the examined countries. The implementation of the outlined recommendations could contribute to reducing the burden associated with hypertension and hazardous and harmful alcohol use and thus to achievement of the NCD targets. Implementation should be conducted in controlled settings with evaluation, including, but not limited to, economic evaluation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Master 12 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 28 27%
Unknown 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 19%
Psychology 6 6%
Neuroscience 5 5%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 25 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2019.
All research outputs
#540,816
of 16,028,717 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#429
of 2,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,603
of 280,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,028,717 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,501 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them