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Effect of simvastatin on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in endometriosis patients: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, September 2017
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2 tweeters

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9 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of simvastatin on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in endometriosis patients: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Women's Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12905-017-0446-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wanwisa Waiyaput, Somphoch Pumipichet, Sawaek Weerakiet, Sasivimol Rattanasiri, Areepan Sophonsritsuk

Abstract

Simvastatin is a promising new drug for the treatment of endometriosis. It is a cholesterol-lowering drug that acts by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, resulting in a decrease in mevalonate, a precursor of cholesterol and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). This study investigated the effect of pre-operative oral simvastatin administration on MCP-1 gene expression and serum MCP-1 protein levels in patients with endometriosis. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted at the Reproductive Endocrinology Unit of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital. Forty women (mean age: 18-45 years) scheduled for laparoscopic surgery who had been diagnosed with endometriosis were recruited and randomly assigned to either a treatment group (20 mg/d of orally administered simvastatin for 2 weeks before surgery) or an untreated control group. Serum was collected before and after treatment and protein levels of MCP-1 were determined. MCP-1 and CD68 transcript levels were also quantified using real-time PCR on endometriotic cyst tissues. MCP-1 gene expression on endometriotic cyst was not significantly different between the simvastatin-treated and untreated groups (P = 0.99). CD68 expression was higher in the treatment group compared to the control group, but this was not statistically significant (P = 0.055). Serum MCP-1 levels following simvastatin treatment were higher than in samples obtained before treatment (297.89 ± 70.77 and 255.51 ± 63.79 pg/ml, respectively) (P = 0.01). Treatment with 20 mg/d of simvastatin for 2 weeks did not reduce the expression of either the chemokine MCP-1 gene or macrophage-specific genes. Cumulatively, this suggests that simvastatin is not ideal for treating endometriosis because a higher dose of simvastatin (40-100 mg/d) would be needed to achieve the target outcome, which would significantly increase the risk of myopathy in patients. Thai Clinical Trials Registry TCTR20130627003 Registered: June 27, 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 20%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 11 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 17 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,129,970
of 11,918,812 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#408
of 638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,350
of 270,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#12
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,918,812 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 638 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,682 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.