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In-hospital mortality following treatment with red blood cell transfusion or inotropic therapy during early goal-directed therapy for septic shock: a retrospective propensity-adjusted analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
In-hospital mortality following treatment with red blood cell transfusion or inotropic therapy during early goal-directed therapy for septic shock: a retrospective propensity-adjusted analysis
Published in
Critical Care, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13054-014-0496-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dustin G Mark, John W Morehouse, Yun-Yi Hung, Mamata V Kene, Andrew R Elms, Vincent Liu, Dustin W Ballard, David R Vinson

Abstract

IntroductionWe sought to investigate whether treatment of subnormal (<70%) central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) with inotropes or red blood cell (RBC) transfusion during early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) for septic shock is independently associated with in-hospital mortality.MethodsRetrospective analysis of a prospective EGDT patient database drawn from 21 emergency departments with a single standardized EGDT protocol. Patients were included if, during EGDT, patients concomitantly achieved a central venous pressure (CVP) of ¿8 mm Hg and a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of ¿65 mm Hg while registering a ScvO2¿<¿70%. Treatment propensity scores for either RBC transfusion or inotrope administration were separately determined from independent patient sub-cohorts. Propensity-adjusted logistic regression analyses were conducted to test for associations between treatments and in-hospital mortality.ResultsOf 2595 EGDT patients, 572 (22.0%) met study inclusion criteria. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 20.5%. Inotropes or RBC transfusions were administered for an ScvO2¿<¿70% to 51.9% patients. Patients were not statistically more likely to achieve an ScvO2 of ¿70% if they were treated with RBC transfusion alone (29/59, 49.2%, P¿=¿0.19), inotropic therapy alone (104/226, 46.0%, P¿=¿0.15) or both RBC and inotropic therapy (7/12, 58.3%, P¿=¿0.23) as compared to no therapy (108/275, 39.3%). Following adjustment for treatment propensity score, RBC transfusion was associated with a decreased adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of in-hospital mortality among patients with hemoglobin values less than 10 g/dL (aOR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-0.97, P¿=¿0.04) while inotropic therapy was not associated with in-hospital mortality among patients with hemoglobin values of 10 g/dL or greater (aOR 1.16, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.96, P¿=¿0.57).ConclusionsAmong patients with septic shock treated with EGDT in the setting of subnormal ScvO2 values despite meeting CVP and MAP target goals, treatment with RBC transfusion may be independently associated with decreased in-hospital mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Greece 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 49 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 16%
Other 7 14%
Student > Postgraduate 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 73%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Mathematics 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Unknown 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2014.
All research outputs
#5,010,739
of 21,326,395 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#2,959
of 5,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,221
of 217,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#44
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,326,395 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,801 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,114 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.